Nativist Nonsense and Idiotic Idealism

Hard to see when blinded by ideology

I very much appreciate, understand, and value design aesthetics and well built technology. I’m also an amateur philosopher in my free time, so I can appreciate ideas, ideals, and ideologies in themselves. All of this is all well and good, but what I don’t get is people who get so wrapped up in some design or technological ideology that they blind themselves to what is good apart from that. Let me give you some examples that I have heard and seen many times in my career in one flavor or another:

  • Blindly preferring some piece of software or technology purely on the basis that it is “open” or even “standards based.”
  • Blindly preferring some piece of software or technology purely on the basis that it is made by your pet favorite company.
  • Refusing to install or use some piece of software or technology on the basis that it is made by some company you don’t like.
  • Refusing to install or use some piece of software or technology on the basis that it is “open” or “free.”
  • Irrationally assuming that because some company had a challenge with a bug, virus, security, privacy, free-ness, openness, whatever, then everything that company does thereafter is tainted and to be avoided.
  • Irrationally assuming that because something is “native” that it must be better than a non-native alternative.
  • Refusing to code in some language on the basis that you don’t like it/it’s not your preferred one.
  • Prejudging a piece of software because it is built on <insert name of technology stack you don’t like>.

And there are a host of other, even less defensible positions that otherwise quite intelligent people take in relation to design and technology. Especially for people who are supposed to be professionals in technology and/or design, this sort of blind prejudice and ideology-based thinking is inanity; it is out of place, unbecoming, and simply unacceptable.

Most of us in design and technology are not paid to promote ideologies; we are paid to produce things. At the end of the day, the things that make us more productive and solve each particular problem best are the things we should be using. There are good ideas everywhere, and if we blind ourselves to them, we are injuring our careers and doing an injustice to those who pay us with the understanding that we will make the best thing for them in the most productive way possible.

Sure, you can have your preferences. Sure, you can espouse best practices and design philosophies that make sense to you. Heck, you can even advocate for them. But just don’t let those loom so large in your mind’s eye that you cannot see the good in things that don’t align with them. Don’t get so stuck on a technology or a framework or a practice or a pattern or a principle that you choose it when there are better options available for the problem at hand. Everything is not a nail, no matter how superior you think your hammer is. Don’t let your ideals become prejudices that instead of fostering awesomeness rather become a roadblock for you and those you work with and for.

And this extends, importantly, to people as well. Don’t treat those who don’t share your ideals with disdain. Don’t imagine for a second that because you adhere to some ideology (“craftsmanship” or “big ‘D’ Design” or whatever) this makes you more professional or better than they are. I’ve even heard people judge other professionals by when they purportedly clock in and out, as if having a healthy work-life balance somehow makes you less professional or capable!

In our line of work, it is the output, the products of our efforts, that matter most, not how we get there, and there are most definitely many paths to good outcomes. The judges of these outcomes are our clients, our customers, our markets, our users–not us. And the primary criterion in judging a good outcome is most certainly not how well our work aligned with any given ideology, however well-intentioned it may be.

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4 thoughts on “Nativist Nonsense and Idiotic Idealism

      1. Yes, I mean “betrayed” when it affects your professional way of doing things. We get paid for our productivity, knowledge, bad/good experiences, intuition, guts and choices as professionals. If all of them benefit the user, it’s fine to be biased by previous experiences (not idealisms), i guess. 😀

  1. I get what you’re saying and agree that ignoring past failures would be foolish; my point is to not let them blind you to new/good work from the same source. People and companies can and should learn from failures and become better because of them.

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